Image: 123RF/ Werner Lehmann
Image: 123RF/ Werner Lehmann

The South African Institute of Race Relations (IRR) has released the second part of its comprehensive survey of voters.

The results show that 41% of those who have heard of the proposed policy of land expropriation without compensation "somewhat" or "strongly" oppose it. Only 30% of those who have heard of it "somewhat" or "strongly" support the policy.

The ANC announcement that it is planning amend the constitution to make it clear that land can be expropriated without compensation has been the subject of intense debate.

This is the first survey to test voter opinions on the matter.

Here are the main findings, according to the IRR:

• 27% of all voters have not heard of expropriation without compensation;

• 41% of all voters who have heard of expropriation without compensation, “somewhat” or “strongly” oppose the policy;

• 30% of all voters who have heard of expropriation without compensation, “somewhat” or “strongly” support the policy;

• 51% of all voters believe an alternative to expropriation without compensation should be pursued, while 17% believe no land reform is necessary;

• 68% of all voters believe “Individuals should have the right to own land in their private capacity”.

• 31% of all voters believe “all land in SA should be owned by the government”.

However, support for expropriation without compensation collapses when respondents are asked whether the government should be able to take land they own themselves. Ninety precent of all voters are “somewhat” or “strongly” opposed this.

Graphic: IRR
Graphic: IRR

The IRR said: "There is a stark disjuncture between black voters (37% support) and minority voters (3% support) with regard to the approach of “taking land from whites without paying”.

However, there is stronger support across demographics for an alternative approach, either willing buyer, willing seller or the redistribution of government land (51% of all voters support an alternative). A reasonably consistent block of voters across all races (between 15% among black voters and 24% among minority voters) believe there is no need for land reform."

Graphic: IRR
Graphic: IRR

The survey also showed that most South Africans wanted individuals to have the right to own land "in their private capacity".

Graphic: IRR
Graphic: IRR

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