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Picture: 123RF/RONNARONG THANUTHATTAPHONG
Picture: 123RF/RONNARONG THANUTHATTAPHONG

Bengaluru — Gold prices slipped on Friday, pressured by the strength in US Treasury yields and the dollar, which also put bullion on course for its first weekly loss in three.

Spot gold was down 0.1% at $1,949.33/oz, at 2.42am GMT. US gold futures were up 0.2% at $1,952.00.

“The outlook for gold is subdued as rising rates obviously weigh, but until we break the trading range (between $1,930 to under $2,000) in a convincing manner ... we really don’t have much of a direction for gold,” said Michael McCarthy, chief strategy officer at Tiger Brokers, Australia.

Benchmark US 10-year Treasury yields extended gains as Federal Reserve officials took a hawkish tone on tightening policy, cementing the view that the US central bank will hike interest rates aggressively as it fights soaring inflation. Gold is highly sensitive to rising US short-term interest rates and higher yields, which increase the opportunity cost of holding non-yielding bullion.

A stronger US dollar could also pressure gold, while on the other hand, the geopolitical uncertainty remains a support and the gold price is stuck in the middle of those two conflicting currents, McCarthy said.

A firmer dollar makes greenback-priced gold less attractive for overseas buyers. Gold is down about 1.3% so far this week. Prices rose to near the key mark of $2,000/oz on Monday on safe-haven demand and mounting worries over inflation, but have since pulled back to hit a two-week low in the previous session.

“With stagflation moving from a potential tail risk to reality, investors worldwide are turning to gold as a keen portfolio diversifier,” Stephen Innes, managing partner at SPI Asset Management said in a note.

Spot silver fell 0.6% to $24.50/oz, and platinum eased 0.2% to $966.56, with both poised for weekly dips. Palladium rose 0.4% to $2,431.69/oz.

Reuters

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