London — Oil slipped to around $60 a barrel on Monday after data showed weakening imports and exports in China, the world’s second-largest oil consumer, raising the prospect of a slowdown in fuel demand. China’s exports fell by the most in two years in December while imports contracted, official figures showed, pointing to further weakness in what is also the world’s second-largest economy. Brent crude, the international benchmark, fell 50c to $59.98 a barrel by 9.32am GMT, trading as low as $59.37 intraday. US crude slipped 41c to $51.18. “Both imports and exports disappointed expectations and are set to revive fears about a global growth slowdown,” said Norbert Ruecker, head of macro and commodity research at Swiss bank Julius Baer. Crude gave up an earlier gain following the release on Monday of the Chinese figures, the latest to point to an economic slowdown since the second half of 2018. Asian stock markets also slipped and European equities fell in early trade. “Oil prices are...

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