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The electric Porsche GT4 ePerformance is based on the 718 Cayman GT4. Picture: SUPPLIED
The electric Porsche GT4 ePerformance is based on the 718 Cayman GT4. Picture: SUPPLIED

Spectators at the world famous Goodwood Festival of Speed from June 23 to 26 were treated to a feast of exotic machinery.

The 2022 event delivered on the goods and showcased plenty of new and old cars in their glory. In the midst of some of the world’s most desirable cars was the Porsche Cayman GT4 ePerformance, an electric prototype based on the 718 GT4 Clubsport chassis.

This racer carries over the technology of the Mission R, the Porsche concept study from 2021 that outlines the vision of a fully electric GT racing car for customer motorsport in the future.

In 2030, Porsche aims to be CO2 neutral across the entire value chain and life cycle of new cars sold. By then, the proportion of all new vehicles featuring all-electric drive should be more than 80%.

Porsche has confirmed that the 718 Boxster and Cayman are going fully electric by 2025, with the new 718 GT4 ePerformance as the brightest confirmation, however the German brand is mum on electrification plans for its halo model, the 911.

There’s a good chance that this electric 718 is a part of the road map towards the realisation of the first fully electric 911.

The company says: “The GT4 ePerformance prototype has a maximum output of up to 800kW. In simulated racing, a steady 450kW is available for 30 minutes — the duration of a Carrera Cup race — while in terms of lap times and top speed, the GT4 ePerformance is on a par with the performance of the current 992-generation 911 GT3 Cup.”

The 718 GT4 ePerformance took second overall at the 2022 Goodwood Fetsival of Speed. Picture: SUPPLIED
The 718 GT4 ePerformance took second overall at the 2022 Goodwood Fetsival of Speed. Picture: SUPPLIED

The 718 GT4 ePerformance has a 900-volt battery technology and can charge from 5% to 80% in about 15 minutes. Its aerodynamics are designed for efficiency because the car has to be able to last the full race distance.

Austrian Porsche works driver Richard Lietz used the electric Cayman to blitz this year’s Goodwood hillclimb in the second quickest time of 45.50 seconds.  The fastest time was 39.08 seconds by the McMurtry Spéirling, a diminutive electric batmobile of a car with downforce created by a fan.

Porsche redesigned about 6,000 parts for the Porsche GT4 ePerformance. The body is made of natural fibre composite materials, synthetic materials and recycled carbon fibres. 

“As a first step, we will unveil this concept to our global partners,” says Oliver Schwab, project manager of the GT4 ePerformance. “With drivers, teams, organisers, authorities and other interested parties, we’re also gathering ideas for Porsche racing formats in the future.” 

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