Higher-revving power and chassis tweaks make this BMW’s sportiest two-wheeler yet. Picture: SUPPLIED
Higher-revving power and chassis tweaks make this BMW’s sportiest two-wheeler yet. Picture: SUPPLIED

BMW’s M division has been creating high-performance cars for decades, and now the badge has finally found its way on to the Bavarian firm’s two-wheelers.

The new M 1000 RR (M RR for short) becomes BMW’s first M motorcycle. Based on the existing S 1000 RR superbike, the new machine is optimised for racetrack performance while still being road legal.

The four-cylinder engine is tweaked to produce more peak power, higher torque in the medium range and 500rpm more maximum speed. Producing 156kW at 14,500rpm, it’s 4kW more powerful than the standard RR, while maximum torque is the same 113Nm, albeit now produced at 11,000rpm instead of 10,500rpm.

The 999cc engine has BMW ShiftCam technology for varying valve timing and valve lift that has been modified for improved track prowess. In addition to its rev limit being increased to a dizzy 15,100rpm, the M RR engine delivers more midrange grunt from 6,000rpm up to its red line.

M winglets in clear-coat carbon have been added to produce extra front downforce and make the bike less wheelie-prone, converting more power into pure propulsion. BMW says the effect of the winglets is also noticeable in curves and when braking, the downforce allowing later braking and increased cornering stability. The bike has a larger windscreen for more effective air protection at its 306km/h top speed.

The chassis uses modified geometry including a longer wheelbase optimised for track use, and it’s the first BMW motorcycle with M brakes. Developed from BMW Motorrad’s racing machines in the Superbike World Championship, the brakes provide maximum fading stability and controllability, and the calipers are styled with the M division’s typical blue anodised coating.

To harness the power, electronic aids include traction control, an anti-hopping clutch and launch control, while there are five riding modes: Rain, Road, Dynamic, Race and Race Pro1-3. It’s also equipped with Shift assistant Pro for shifting gears up and down without a clutch.

M winglets in clear-coat carbon produce extra front downforce. Picture: SUPPLIED
M winglets in clear-coat carbon produce extra front downforce. Picture: SUPPLIED

Standard equipment on BMW’s ultimate sports machine also includes carbon fibre wheels and a lighter titanium exhaust system, with the bike’s overall weight trimmed from 197kg to 192kg.

The digital instrument cluster has the same basic design as the RR but can be optionally specified with a GPS data logger to provide track telemetry.

The new M RR sports its racing genes with the light blue, dark blue and red M Sport colour scheme. Further features of the M RR are the engine covers in granite grey and the fuel filler cap painted black.

For bikers seeking something even more special, the MRR is available with an M competition package which adds M milled parts, an M carbon package as well as a 220g lighter swing arm, a maintenance-free and DLC-coated M Endurance chain, and a passenger package including tail-hump cover.

The M 1000 RR will be launched in SA from the first quarter of 2021 at an indicative price of R690,000.

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