The global new-car market is recovering after April lows, with China and South Korea performing best. Picture: REUTERS
The global new-car market is recovering after April lows, with China and South Korea performing best. Picture: REUTERS

Global light vehicle sales fell by 19.1% in June, year on year, to 6.2-million for a seasonally adjusted annualised running rate (SAAR) of 73.1-million in the month, says data and analytics company GlobalData.

Calum MacRae, Automotive Analyst at GlobalData, says: "While these results are some way behind industry norms, they do demonstrate that the global market has recovered from its April low when a SAAR of 48.2-million was registered."

The data shows all major regions marked June with sales recovering from their earlier low points. The best-performing region was the Asia-Pacific, with sales falling 11.7% year on year, pushed along by a 40.7% hike in South Korea and China’s markets returning near to year-ago levels.

Europe’s sales declined by 20.2% (compared with May at -54% and April with -75.6%) supported by the easing of lockdowns and the introduction of industry support in France and other West European countries.

MacRae continues: “After a strong recovery in May, North America’s performance in June saw sales falling 26.5% to a level just over 6%, which is better than May’s results.

"Consumer confidence remains extremely weak and more downside risk has been introduced to the forecast — particularly in the US, as the key markets of Texas, Florida and California are now the epicentre of the country’s Covid-19 outbreak. As for the rest of the year, GlobalData’s world light vehicle market forecast remains at 73-million, a 17% fall on 2019’s market."

In SA, new-vehicle sales were down 36.9% from January to June compared to the same period last year, down to 162,570 units against 257,624.


New boss for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles SA

Ismaeel Hassen has been appointed the new CEO for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles SA. Picture: SUPPLIED
Ismaeel Hassen has been appointed the new CEO for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles SA. Picture: SUPPLIED

As part of a restructure across some African markets, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles (FCA) has appointed Ismaeel Hassen as CEO for SA. Pierre Martin Bos, who was appointed as CEO in November, will now head up Morocco.

"The global pandemic has placed many challenges on the global automotive industry, along with many new opportunities," said  Bos. "I am very grateful to have had the opportunity to lead the South African market for FCA as our brands have shown a strong growth and potential over the past year. While I am incredibly sad to have spent less time in SA than I thought I would, I leave the market in very capable hands with Ismaeel at the helm and a team who has seasoned itself very quickly."

No stranger to the FCA family, Hassen returned to SA in August last year after spending just over a decade in the Middle East launching many of the FCA brands and developing the network with General Distributors. His experience extends across sales, product, marketing, logistics and aftersales.

Hassen  holds an MBA from the University of Wolverhampton in the UK.


Number of public charging points for electric vehicles nears 1m mark

The number of public charging points for electric vehicles is approaching one million worldwide. Picture: REUTERS
The number of public charging points for electric vehicles is approaching one million worldwide. Picture: REUTERS

The number of public charging points for electric vehicles is approaching one million worldwide.

ETX Studio puts the spotlight on a number that highlights a unique aspect of our times, and has listed 862,118 as the number of public charging points that were in operation around the world at the end of 2019, according to the latest report from the International Energy Agency (IEA). The figure represents an increase of 60% in just one year.

China alone accounts for nearly 60% of all charging points, far ahead of the US, the Netherlands and Germany. Next comes Japan, France and the UK.

The proportion of fast chargers, which deliver more than 22 kWh, is also on the rise. As it stands, 31% of the world's public charging infrastructure is fast, with some points delivering enough power for an 80% recharge in less than 40 minutes for most vehicles, and in just 15 minutes for more advanced ones.

Car manufacturers are working on faster recharging solutions, among them Volkswagen, which has teamed up with energy supplier E.ON on a new high-speed charging solution that guarantees a range of up to 200km after just 15 minutes of charging time. In parallel with this project, Volkswagen has also formed a consortium with BMW, Daimler and Ford to develop a high-speed charging network. For its part, Tesla is continuing to optimise its "Superchargers," which are now being installed worldwide.

The IEA report also points out that there are now more than 6.5-million private charging points installed around the world. It reflects the growth of electric-car sales around the world under tightened CO2 emissions rules.

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