In a bid to appear culturally sensitive and ward off any jingoistic assault on his bid for the American-owned Anheuser-Busch in 2008, InBev’s Carlos Brito promised to take care of the company’s world-famous horses At first blush, the 250 Clydesdales didn’t do too badly out of it.In a bid to appear culturally sensitive and ward off any jingoistic assault on his bid for the American-owned Anheuser-Busch in 2008, InBev’s Carlos Brito promised to take care of the company’s world-famous horses. Brito’s advisers had warned him to treat these animals as the holy cows of Budweiser culture and make nice.The humans weren’t so lucky. It’s difficult to say who suffered most: the 3,000 workers who lost their jobs almost immediately, or the 12,000 who were left behind to deal with a complete reworking of their physical and cultural workplace."Rather than chipping away at Anheuser’s layers of waste and making gradual shifts to keep employees from panicking, the Brazilians decided to blow everythin...

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